4:06 pm, Monday, 22 April 2024

Leap Year Addition History

Leap year occurs once in four years. For many years the counting of years has been adjusted by leap years. A leap year calendar adds an extra day at the end of February. But there was only one time in the history of the world when the date 30 February was added to the calendar.The time is 1712. 30th February was added to the calendar that year. This was done as part of a double leap year in Sweden.
Leap Year Addition History:
It is known that the people of ancient Rome used to calculate the year according to the solar calendar. But that calendar was not completely compatible with the solar year. Because the earth does not take 365 days to circle the sun once. It takes five hours, 48 ​​minutes and 56 seconds longer than 365 days. To coordinate this extra time, Sosigenes proposed the creation of a calendar, which corresponded almost exactly to that of the Egyptians.
An extra day is added to the 365 days every four years to accommodate the solar year. Thus was born the Julian calendar, named in honor of its originator, Julius Caesar. But even this Julian calendar did not last long. Due to some inconsistencies in that calendar, the Gregorian calendar gradually replaced the Julian calendar from 1582.
Since an extra day was needed every four years, Pope Gregory XIII decided to ‘perfect’ the calendar by issuing a decree. They said, the extra day of leap year will be 29th February.
On the advice of the astronomer Christopher Clavius, the wise men of the time decided to bring the year to this alignment, the day after October 4th in 1582 being October 15th. In other words, it will disappear for 10 days. Basically in this way the time gap between solar years is removed.
Various rulers throughout history divided the year into months for political necessity. That is, there was never a year in 12 months. Again, according to their personal wishes, extra days were added or removed from the months. Consequently, it became necessary to coordinate these calendars with the solar year, which could not be ignored.
Emperor Julius Caesar, about two thousand years ago, introduced a calendar similar to the one we use today. According to that so-called Julian calendar, there were 12 months in a year. And some of the months were counted with 30 days and some with 31 days. Only the month of February was counted with 28 or 29 days.
The year started from March. Because it is the beginning of spring. Therefore, the last month of the year, February is chosen for leap year. Since a year consists of 365 days in six hours, leap years have been marked since Roman time to accommodate the extra six hours.
This calculation has been around for centuries, but this calculation method is not accurate. The solar year is actually a bit shorter – 11 minutes 14.784 seconds shorter, to be precise. While this may not seem like a big difference, it can have an immediate impact. But over the years, these extra minutes/seconds add up and make a big difference. This is why Pope Gregory XIII made some changes in 1582 to correct the inconsistencies in his calendar.
Those who were associated with the Catholic Church, first adopted this calendar. Instead of eliminating leap years for the next four decades, they cut 10 days from October in one leap. In 1582, the day after Thursday, October 5, was made Friday, October 14.
Other Protestant nations and empires were initially reluctant to adopt this calendar, but eventually they too adopted this modified calendar.
When Sweden decided to adopt the Gregorian calendar, they saw fit to gradually adapt to the change. That’s why they skip February’s leap days for 40 consecutive years, until they align. According to their long-followed Julian calendar, 1700 was a leap year, but they only had 28 days in February. Similarly, although 1704 and 1708 were leap years, they wanted to limit the month of February to 28 days.
But, at that time the war started. They forget about the change of not having a leap year. A few years later, Emperor Charles XII realized that Sweden’s calendar was neither Julian nor Gregorian. He then took strict measures in the formulation of the calendar and canceled all previous changes
But, since they had already omitted the leap year of 1700, Emperor Charles XII ordered that an extra day be added in addition to February 29 in 1712, another leap year. Thus the first and last in history is the time of Julius Caesar.

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Leap Year Addition History

Update Time : 12:38:23 pm, Thursday, 29 February 2024

Leap year occurs once in four years. For many years the counting of years has been adjusted by leap years. A leap year calendar adds an extra day at the end of February. But there was only one time in the history of the world when the date 30 February was added to the calendar.The time is 1712. 30th February was added to the calendar that year. This was done as part of a double leap year in Sweden.
Leap Year Addition History:
It is known that the people of ancient Rome used to calculate the year according to the solar calendar. But that calendar was not completely compatible with the solar year. Because the earth does not take 365 days to circle the sun once. It takes five hours, 48 ​​minutes and 56 seconds longer than 365 days. To coordinate this extra time, Sosigenes proposed the creation of a calendar, which corresponded almost exactly to that of the Egyptians.
An extra day is added to the 365 days every four years to accommodate the solar year. Thus was born the Julian calendar, named in honor of its originator, Julius Caesar. But even this Julian calendar did not last long. Due to some inconsistencies in that calendar, the Gregorian calendar gradually replaced the Julian calendar from 1582.
Since an extra day was needed every four years, Pope Gregory XIII decided to ‘perfect’ the calendar by issuing a decree. They said, the extra day of leap year will be 29th February.
On the advice of the astronomer Christopher Clavius, the wise men of the time decided to bring the year to this alignment, the day after October 4th in 1582 being October 15th. In other words, it will disappear for 10 days. Basically in this way the time gap between solar years is removed.
Various rulers throughout history divided the year into months for political necessity. That is, there was never a year in 12 months. Again, according to their personal wishes, extra days were added or removed from the months. Consequently, it became necessary to coordinate these calendars with the solar year, which could not be ignored.
Emperor Julius Caesar, about two thousand years ago, introduced a calendar similar to the one we use today. According to that so-called Julian calendar, there were 12 months in a year. And some of the months were counted with 30 days and some with 31 days. Only the month of February was counted with 28 or 29 days.
The year started from March. Because it is the beginning of spring. Therefore, the last month of the year, February is chosen for leap year. Since a year consists of 365 days in six hours, leap years have been marked since Roman time to accommodate the extra six hours.
This calculation has been around for centuries, but this calculation method is not accurate. The solar year is actually a bit shorter – 11 minutes 14.784 seconds shorter, to be precise. While this may not seem like a big difference, it can have an immediate impact. But over the years, these extra minutes/seconds add up and make a big difference. This is why Pope Gregory XIII made some changes in 1582 to correct the inconsistencies in his calendar.
Those who were associated with the Catholic Church, first adopted this calendar. Instead of eliminating leap years for the next four decades, they cut 10 days from October in one leap. In 1582, the day after Thursday, October 5, was made Friday, October 14.
Other Protestant nations and empires were initially reluctant to adopt this calendar, but eventually they too adopted this modified calendar.
When Sweden decided to adopt the Gregorian calendar, they saw fit to gradually adapt to the change. That’s why they skip February’s leap days for 40 consecutive years, until they align. According to their long-followed Julian calendar, 1700 was a leap year, but they only had 28 days in February. Similarly, although 1704 and 1708 were leap years, they wanted to limit the month of February to 28 days.
But, at that time the war started. They forget about the change of not having a leap year. A few years later, Emperor Charles XII realized that Sweden’s calendar was neither Julian nor Gregorian. He then took strict measures in the formulation of the calendar and canceled all previous changes
But, since they had already omitted the leap year of 1700, Emperor Charles XII ordered that an extra day be added in addition to February 29 in 1712, another leap year. Thus the first and last in history is the time of Julius Caesar.